Archive for Networking

Unless you live under a rock, chances are your everyday activities will involve some level of networking. Networking is critical. It provides the knowledge, resources, and support system that can sustain one’s personal development. Everyone does it, even unconsciously.

From what I’ve observed, however, most people have a flawed and negative perception of networking. They think the act of sharing information is unidirectional and often don’t know who they should network with. During events, they tend to target either prominent attendees or panelists, as if they are the only people who can help them achieve their goals. I’ve had many elevator chats with people who went home with their stack of business cards almost untouched because they didn’t get to speak with the people they wanted. The truth is, effective networking runs on a give-and-take basis. No one knows so much as to not need more knowledge and information. Anyone can offer valuable insight and the biggest network that we too often don’t take advantage of is the one that is the most accessible to us: our peers.

Who are they? At a networking event, they are the people who, like you, are either looking to make a connection, find a mentor or learn about a particular topic. Our peers include classmates, friends, colleagues etc. We tend to underestimate them because they are generally at the same stage in life and have similar goals so we assume they can’t help us in any significant way, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Our peers have knowledge, experience and talents that can benefit us. For example, an old classmate could be the one who refers you to their manager for potential hiring. It’s easier to maintain relationships with this group because they are people we already know. Here are some ways in which you can successfully network with your peers:

  1. Show Interest

The best way to find out how you can help someone (or vice-versa) is by asking questions. Ask about their background, their current jobs, their career aspirations, short or long-terms goals – anything to keep the conversation going. You can send monthly check-in emails to a group of old connections or send out invitations to coffee or lunch dates. People love talking about themselves so be there to listen. Showing a little interest in someone else’s life, is often greatly appreciated. You can learn a lot from that. At the same time, be sure to participate in the conversation as well.

  1. Organize Mastermind Groups

When you’re lucky to meet a group of like-minded people, it’s worth exploring that connection. Start a meetup group and get together frequently to openly talk about your goals, the obstacles that you encounter and your progress. Being part of support groups can only move you forward. It’s a great way to stay motivated and not fall behind as you hold each other accountable.

  1. Share Your Experience

I recently connected with someone after sharing my experience interning at Hearst Magazines. She was offered a position there and wanted to have a better understanding of the company’s culture in order to make a decision. She was wise to ask someone who had been in that position before.

When you share your experience, you open yourself to constructive feedback as people could point out mistakes that you wouldn’t have otherwise realized you’d made.. So always be open to listening to people and sharing your story.

  1. Exchange Knowledge and Information

When you make it a habit to listen to people and voice your goals, you position yourself to be a contributor and to also stay on top of industry news and important events. My friends and I consistently email each other useful articles, links to job postings or important events happening because we know each other’s interests. Having this kind of support is very enriching and it helps us stay focused.

  1. Peer-to-Peer Coaching

I heard this term for the first time at Eventsy’s Women’s Empowerment Summit. If your peers have particular skills, use them to your advantage. If an old classmate knows how to design business cards, ask for their services before hiring a professional. The same way, if you’re good at cover letter writing for example, help your peers proofread their job applications. Harnessing your network’s abilities will cost less and be more beneficial to all of you.

  1. Attend Networking Events Together

Attending networking events with your peers has its perks. It makes it easier to spark a conversation with someone. You can also spread out and speak to as many people as possible and then share the things you’ve learned.

We are constantly surrounded by our peers and it’s a network that we interact with daily. Learning how to optimize it is a worthy investment.

By Shelcy Joseph

About the Author

Shelcy Joseph is a freelance writer and career blogger living in New York City. She frequently contributes to several publications such as Classy Career Girl, That Working Girl, FindSpark, LinkedIn Pulse, Eventsy etc. Connect with her via Twitter, Gmail or LinkedIn.

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Today’s post is contributed by NYC intern Rachael Collins

Arianna HuffingtonCo-founder, president and Editor-in-Chief of Huffington Post, Arianna Huffington, recently spoke at the Business Chicks Luncheon in New York, NY on her life experiences, daily habits and views on getting enough sleep. I was lucky enough to volunteer helping Business Chicks with coordinating and running the event, which proved to be an extremely valuable experience.

The focus of Arianna’s address was placed on her newest book, The Sleep Revolution, which explores sleep from all angles. It covers the history of sleep, the role of dreams in our lives and the consequences of sleep deprivation, all of which are backed by sleep science.

Huffington shared her belief that our relationship with technology means that we are now more hooked on our smart phones than ever before. She urged the audience to change their habit of charging mobile devices in the bedroom. This removes the temptation to check in on work emails and social media during a time when we should be recharging ourselves.

Arianna shared her advice that “a good day, begins the night before” and continued with one of the best analogies of sleep I’ve heard yet: “you’re either entertaining the guests or cleaning up the house. Not both.” Here she is referring to the science of sleep and how it plays a crucial role in providing our body time to clean out toxic waste in the brain from the day. Essentially, she said we need to “wash the day away” to enable us to perform better. She referred to several top tier media pieces which have recently covered the topic, however more specifically she called out a Harvard Business Review piece on the link between effective leadership and sleep (tip: it’s a great read).

HuffingtonContinuing on the theme of sleep, she gave advice on a few items to keep on your nightstand inlcuding: an old fashioned alarm clock (since your phone shouldn’t be anywhere nearby), a glass of water, a dream book to note down the themes in your dreams, a picture of something you love and a fresh flower.  As usual, Arianna’s sense of humor shined through and she suggested that “flowers can be expensive, so if you are a college student, just pick one on your walk home…I’m sure your neighbor won’t mind!”

Arianna left me with a few additional pieces of advice which I will keep in mind in future career and life situations: live life as though everything is rigged in your favor, never listen to the voice of doubt in your head, disconnect from the treadmill of your life to get creative and read books that remind you that you are more than your job.

 

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Today’s post is contributed by NYC intern Brooke Ferreri

If you are looking for an internship (and it doesn’t have to be a PR internship) stop right now because you’ve come to the right spot! Here are some tricks of the trade, from someone who knows how you feel.

  1. A.B.S – Always Be Stalking (Yes, this is my attempt at a Glengarry Glen Ross pun): As we all know, when going on interviews you want to be prepared with a general knowledge of the company’s history. What’s less known is the importance of understanding a company’s corporate culture, and what better way to do your research than through a little social media stalking? LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram & blogs (like this one) were all extremely useful tools in my internship search. I found LinkedIn to be very helpful because it gave me a professional run down of the company, plus it allowed me to put a face to the name when it came time to interview. I also recommend following the company you are interested in on Twitter and Instagram, these sites tend to be more relaxed and reflective of a company’s corporate culture. You can learn a lot about a person or company by what they are saying on social media. In today’s business landscape, a good corporate culture is just as big of a factor as the job description is in determining whether or not a position is right for you. With a little help from social media, you can easily figure this out.
  1. Organization: If you are interested in PR, chances are you are going to spend a lot of time in excel and your internship search is the perfect practice. I kept a detailed list of everywhere I applied and included the date, position, and person I contacted. This organized list made it easy to know when it was time for me to follow up with companies. As a bonus, now that I have an internship in PR I am an Excel pro (well, kind of).
  1. Connections: Never underestimate the power of a good connection. Talk with as many people as possible in your field of interest, and if you know someone through school, family or friends who work for the company you are interested in, be sure to utilize them. In general, people want to help you find a job, so do not be afraid to ask for advice. That’s how I landed an internship here, shout out to Laura Bedrossian.
  1. Be Aggressive: During this process, don’t be afraid to go after any company or opportunity. If you find a company you are interested in, reach out to them, even if you don’t see any job postings, you never know what might happen and the timing may be right.
  1. Don’t (stop never) give up: A little advice from me and my friends,  S Club 7. I know the internship search can be a complete drag at times but it is important to not let yourself get discouraged. Negative thoughts will not help with the process and it will only slow you down. Always remember, you are a “talented, brilliant, powerful musk-ox” and you will find an internship eventually. It may even be here!
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Today’s post is contributed by NYC intern Rachael Collins

The subject of being proactive in both your career and day-to-day work has been discussed on PRiscope in the past, and is something I try to consciously achieve as much as possible. Not only must you do good work to succeed, but being proactive pushes you to the next level.

Working in PR, you never know what will be dished onto your plate without notice. By stepping outside my comfort zone, I put up my hand to attend a panel presentation at Baruch College. I was initially asked simply to accompany Intern Committee member, Chris Piedmont, for the experience and networking. However, in typical PR style, I was asked to be a speaker at the last minute. At the panel, I covered extra-curricular activities that I undertook at college and networking while in school.

Extra-curricular activities

During college, I was a member of a student society called AMPed that was for advertising, marketing, public relations and international business students. By being involved in a student society like this, I was exposed to industry leaders, business owners and college alumni who have gone on to do great things since graduating. The insights I received from being an AMPed member were extremely valuable in shaping my understanding of the PR industry and have helped me to connect with influential communications professionals.

If you can make the commitment to a student society or similar group, it will help you with your day-to-day duties, whether you’re an intern or entry level professional. You will have a better understanding of how an agency operates and will walk away with the ability to reach out to contacts in the future.

Networking

One of the first classes I took in college covered networking and to this day, could be one of the most valuable learning experiences I have been involved in. Networking is vital to being successful in the PR and communications industries because it allows you to make both business and personal connections that help your workplace and career progress.

My advice to the students at the panel, and for any interns or entry level communicators, is to network wherever and whenever possible. Always keep your ears open to opportunities because you never know when a random conversation with a stranger can turn into a new connection who brings a lot to the table. Your coworker today could be a valuable contact in the future who may help you land that job, media placement or client you’ve been hunting for.

These two discussion topics both have one thing in common; they involve putting your hand up for foreseeable and proactive opportunities that will push you outside your comfort zone.

All in all, Peppercomm’s visit to Baruch College was a great experience for us, and we were delighted to answer the smart questions of the students in the room. It was also fantastic to meet the other panelists from such a diverse mix of communication backgrounds.

Here’s to more hand raising.

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TaylorAs a sophomore in college, transferring to Rutgers University was a big leap and something I couldn’t have been more excited about. As soon as I arrived for my first semester, I knew I wanted to be involved. I joined a great club called the Association for Woman in Communication. In joining this club, I received some great experiences, tips, and guest speakers! The day that Peppercomm came to talk to our club really stood out for me. Samantha Bruno, our guest speaker, really described it as an exciting, creative, and all around great firm to intern and work. I had to know more!

My friends and I were interested in shadowing the current interns Peppercomm. Samantha was more than happy to help set up a whole day for us to learn and explore the firm! Right from the start I knew I loved the people that represented this place.

The shadowing experience my friends and I had was so informative and really showed how Peppercomm operates and thrives as a PR firm. Every single person we met was so delighted to speak to us and answer any questions we had. We were enlightened about many different tasks that the company takes on and were all so blown away about what it takes to really run a successful firm. The interns ate lunch with us and were truly happy to answer any of our questions about working at Peppercomm. Everything they had to say was extremely positive and as the day went by I became more excited about the future and applying for an internship.

All in all, the day I spent there really opened my eyes and showed me what it is like to truly enjoy where you work. The positive atmosphere and the welcoming people only made me more excited to apply and learn more about the community around Peppercomm. The experience was illuminating and will be hard to top! My friends and I thank everyone who talked and helped us!

I can’t wait to be back!

Today’s guest post was written by Rutgers University student Taylor Blume

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