Archive for Business

LennyBoy

Recently, my mother (of all people) directed me to the following Cracked article from David Wong: “6 Harsh Truths That Will Make You a Better Person”. In her note with the link, my mom advised, “Long and with bad language, but funny and good points made.” Naturally, I was intrigued, and decided to give ‘er a read—and a delightfully inappropriate, engaging read it was!

In addition to a glorious image of Lenny Kravitz prancing around in a titanic scarf, Wong gave me the push I needed to “own” 2014. While this specific piece features many worthy pointers, one argument stood out in particular. To quote Wong*:

… The end of 2014, that’s our deadline. While other people are telling you “Let’s make a New Year’s resolution to lose 15 pounds this year!” I’m going to say let’s pledge to do freaking anything — add any skill, any improvement to your human tool set, and get good enough at it to impress people. Don’t ask me what – good grief, pick something at random if you don’t know. Take a class in karate, or ballroom dancing, or pottery. Learn to bake. Build a birdhouse. Learn massage. Learn a programming language. Film a parody. Adopt a superhero persona and fight crime. Write a comment on PRiscope.

But the key is, I don’t want you to focus on something great that you’re going to make happen to you (“I’m going to find a husband, I’m going to make lots of money…”). I want you to purely focus on giving yourself a skill that would make you ever so slightly more interesting and valuable to other people.

“I don’t have the money to take a cooking class.” Then Google “how to cook.” Dagnabbit, you have to kill those excuses. Or they will kill you.

Of course self-improvement, and this idea of “adding value to society” is nothing new; but Wong found a way to voice the point in an amusing way that forced me to listen. As a semi-recent college grad making my career début in the PR field, Wong made me consider the many ways in which I can add value to the audiences in my life—I can learn a new communication skill or program that will benefit my agency and my clients; I can add a new activity to my repertoire to be more interesting and useful to my friends and family; I can be a more gracious neighbor to well…benefit my neighbors (duh); and the list goes on.

The opportunities are there, and excuses are so 2013. Now it’s up to you to develop the skills that’ll help you stand out—as a student, intern, prospective employee, whatever it may be—and benefit the world around you.

How will you apply Wong’s advice to your life this year? Tell us in the comments below!

* And by “to quote Wong” I really mean to “express Wong’s sentiment in a slightly** less offensive manner that aligns more closely with PRiscope’s values & purposes”

** And by “a slightly” I mean “an extremely”

DiggYahoo BookmarksTwitterTechnorati FavoritesDeliciousFacebookShare

offices2christmasparty_story

Christmas, Hanukkah, New Years, Aaron Rodgers’s birthday—it truly is the most wonderful time of the year. With so many occasions to observe, it’s just a matter of time before corporate holiday parties scuttle their way onto the handy dandy Outlook calendar.

Seeing as we’re here to advise on entry-level PR, what kind of mentors would we be if we didn’t provide a little direction on holiday party etiquette? Below, we’ve compiled several tips for navigating your corporate festivities, and making sure you don’t give your managers any reason to quote Taylor Swift on, “I knew you were trouble when you walked in.”

  • Keep it classy. Contrary to popular belief, staying classy isn’t reserved for those residing in San Diego. Whether you’re aware of it or not, your colleagues and managers can and will take note of your behavior. You don’t want to be that girl/guy whose behavior is still a topic of conversation at your firm’s holiday shindig in 2019. Take Mean Girls’ supporting character Amber D’Alessio for example. She may have made out with a hot dog just one time, but people don’t forget. Amber can’t go back in time to fix her famous frank faux pas, but it’s not too late for you to keep it classy. You’ll be glad you did.
  • Use the holiday party as an opportunity to really get to know your colleagues. Electing to participate in the summer kickball league was one of the best choices I made during my interning period at Peppercomm, as it posed an opportunity to connect with colleagues outside of the business context. The holiday party presents a similar opportunity: an occasion to click with coworkers in a casual, stress-free environment. Don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone and converse with people you may not be extremely familiar with—that’s exactly what you should be doing!
  • If you’re going to drink, have a glass of water between each beer. Holiday parties are not the time to whip out your tremendous beer pong skills, or engage in a flip cup competition- especially as an intern. Socially drinking is acceptable, but you never want to be “that intern” for years to come. General rule of thumb is watch the alcohol intake- and as tempting as it may be when you see other coworkers engage in such behavior- do as they say, and not as they do. Which brings us to our next point…
  • Don’t always do as you see. Depending on your office situation, some office parties can be a little more “free” than others. If you see a supervisor/superior drinking a little more than they should, it doesn’t mean you should, too. Always err on the side of caution and keep it to a two drink maximum. It’s important to always maintain a level of professionalism.
  • Dress the part. Ask your coworkers who may have been at former office parties what the dress code is. You don’t want to be underdressed—or on the flip side—wearing a gown if it’s casual.
  • Beware the next day. Whether or not you’re always early, right on time or a few minutes late for work—make SURE that you’re early for work on the morning following your corporate party. This is a day some higher-ups may be paying attention to those who are a bit late or, even worse, calling in sick. Even if you have completely legitimate excuses, being late or calling in is a red flag that you may have had too much fun the night before . . . and believe me, people notice.

For even more tips on the topic, see Jacqueline Whitmore’s recent Entrepreneur piece 7 Ways to Stay Out of Trouble During Your Holiday Office Party.

Do you have any holiday party horror stories or additional etiquette tips to share? Please comment below—we’d love to hear from you!

PlayPlay
DiggYahoo BookmarksTwitterTechnorati FavoritesDeliciousFacebookShare
Oct
17

A day in the life

Posted by: | Comments (0)

We love “day in the life” stories. It’s a great way to gain good insight into a company and see what you could potentially be doing in a position with your dream organization.

One of our summer interns with our Business Outcomes division did just that and reflected on some of his tasks while on the team. Read his post on the Washington and Lee University website and learn a bit more about our Business Outcomes team.

DiggYahoo BookmarksTwitterTechnorati FavoritesDeliciousFacebookShare
Aug
21

The first business trip

Posted by: | Comments (1)

Today’s guest post is by Catharine Cody, current Peppercom intern and lover of London.

A few weeks ago I had the unique opportunity to work at Peppercom’s strategic partner in London, Flagship Consulting.  One of Peppercom’s newest offerings is Comedy Experience, where we teach clients, prospective clients, and even our newest staff members the benefits of performing stand-up comedy.  Since I received comedy training a few weeks prior to the trip, I was asked to help train Flagship Consulting.

However, not all of my time was spent working inside the office extolling the benefits of laugher.  We also went out to dinner every night and got to know each other very well.  The people were amazing.  Not only did the entire staff make sure I had everything I needed, but they became my friends.  Even though we work together and have exchanged numerous emails in the past, seeing them in person solidified our bond.  We realized that, although we work thousands of miles away from each other, our general attitudes and dispositions are the same.

Once back in the states, I realized that the bonds I formed while in London carried over to my work in New York.  I am constantly emailing with the staff about the Olympics and Kate Middleton. (Yes, those are my two London vices and I refuse to defend them.)   I’ve also become friends with them on Facebook and follow them all on Twitter.

If I can only give one piece of advice to my fellow junior workers it would be to travel as much as possible for business.  Not only does it broaden one’s perspective, but it allows you to see that, although we may talk, dress and act differently, people are people no matter where you go.  If you are a great worker, it will be evident on any continent.  Travelling expands one’s horizons and allows you to meet people you might never have the chance to otherwise.  As we know, networking is one of the most important tools one can utilize in their careers.  Why not network with someone from a different country?  This blogger certainly will be doing so from now on.

DiggYahoo BookmarksTwitterTechnorati FavoritesDeliciousFacebookShare
Categories : Business, entry level PR
Comments (1)

Guest post by Sin Yee Ng, Peppercom intern.

The rule above sounds simple, and it should be. But as we have seen time and time again, companies often fail to honor promises. And not only do companies lose customers, but the bad publicity often prevents new customers from trusting them. My experience came in the form of a simple task- booking a flight and hotel for my colleague. I thought generating business was hard enough, who knew giving business could be such a challenging task as well.

When I was given the task, naturally, I turned to the easiest way to book it- the internet. We’ve come a long way since sifting through brochures and dealing with travel agents and airline companies. The efficiency and cheaper operations cost are some of the main reasons why businesses shift their sales online while customers such as myself enjoy shopping online for the ability to compare prices, get the best deals and to do it at our convenience.

After multiple attempts at booking online and getting errors, I knew it was time for some personal communication with an agent. However, the agents I spoke to were not helpful and made the problem worse. So much for the reservation.

After my first bad experience, my colleague and I went back online to another website, this time hoping it would be a more pleasant experience. Nevertheless, the transaction online failed to go through.

When a company advertises themselves to have the “Best Rate Guaranteed” and “Satisfaction Guaranteed”, is it too much to expect that they uphold minimum standards? Walk the walk. Keeping a customer is not only cheaper; it is easier than generating a new one.

I hope companies learn from dealing with unsatisfied customers and make those necessary changes. For example, listen to those recordings they make when people call in and determine what issues they are having. Offering the “best deal” is no use if you cannot deliver on it.

Anyone else like to share their stories of good or horrible online shopping experience?

DiggYahoo BookmarksTwitterTechnorati FavoritesDeliciousFacebookShare
Categories : Business, Intern Tasks
Comments (0)

Intern Podcast

To find out more about life as a Peppercom intern, check out this podcast produced by former Peppercom interns who share their experiences. Click Here